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5 Walks In The Yorkshire Dales

 

Pen-Y-Ghent and Plover Hill

Starting point  and OS Grid reference:

Car park in Horton-in-Ribblesdale (SD 808726)

Ordnance Survey Map

OL2 Yorkshire Dales Southern and Western Areas

Distance:  8.45 miles

Traffic light rating:

(For explanation see My Walks page)

Memory Map.jpg    gpx logo.jpg  

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 Click the PDF logo above to give a printable version of this walk without the photos.

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Yorkshire Dales walk Pen-y-Ghent and Plover Hill - sketch map

To view route as a dynamic Ordnance Survey map click here.

Introduction: There is something about Pen-y-Ghent, one of the summits to be conquered during the famous “Three Peaks” walk – the others being Ingleborough and Whernside. It has an unmistakable majesty and profile all of its own. A bonus is that if you do the walk at the end of March/beginning of April at about 1900 feet on the limestone cliffs you may be lucky enough to see the rare purple saxifrage which was left over from the last ice age. The only issue at this time of year is to watch out for ice on the steep ascent.

The walk starts at the main car park close to the Crown Inn on the B 6479 at Horton-in-Ribblesdale (SD 808726). Horton is also accessible via train from the Settle Carlisle route. At peak times you will find this very busy because Horton is the starting point where entrants “clock in” for the Three Peaks Challenge.

Start: Out of the car park, turn right and walk through the village on the B6479 and round the right-angled bend by the church. Ignore the first on the left (where the post box is) and take the second left which is School Lane. Follow this round until you get to a barn on the left at Brackenbottom Farm and a finger post on the left signed “Pennine Way” (SD 818722). Pass through the gate and the small walkers gate.

 

Pen-y-Ghent

The well worn route then follows the line of the stone wall on your left. Ascend, climbing over a couple of ladder stiles. You reach the ridge just below the “nose” of Pen-y-Ghent at a ‘T’ junction of paths (SD 836728). Turn left.

Pen-y-Ghent

The walk now earns its red traffic light with a vengeance. A very steep climb, keeping the wall to your left and  where you may need to use your hands now and again, takes you to the summit (SD 839734). Here you will find the trig point and an unusual ‘S’ shaped shelter with stone seating built into the wall. There are magnificent views east towards Littondale, west towards Ingleborough and north-west towards Whernside.  

Ingleborough

Whernside

Summit of Pen-y-GhentClimb the ladder stile to the west side of the wall. If for any reason you want to shorten the walk, the Pennine Way straight ahead and indicated by a finger post will take you back to Horton-in-Ribblesdale. Otherwise, turn right following the wall to the summit of Plover Hill. The wall you have been following meets another at a ‘T’ (SD 748752). Cross this wall and the path then kinks slightly right before a steepish grassy descent across Foxup Moor to a broad track (SD 846762). Turn left.  

Basically this track now takes you straight back to Horton but there is an interesting feature to look out for about 1.75 miles after you join the track. This is Hull Pot on the right about 200 feet from the track (SD 825746).

Hull Pot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The track emerges in Horton close to the car park. Ignore any left or right turns on the way.

 

 

  Pen-y-Ghent  

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