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Kindle Books

Kindle book - My Lanzarote. 10 walks and a personal view

Kindle Book And A Pub For Lunch

5 Walks In The Yorkshire Dales

 Lanzarote Walk - Montaña Los Rodeos 

Starting point:

Parking area just outside Mancha Blanca village

Map

Distance: 4.4 miles

Traffic light rating:  

or if you omit the summit

(For explanation see My Walks page)

 Click the PDF logo above to give a printable version of this walk without the photos.

Introduction: This is mostly a very easy walk to Montaña Los Rodeos because it follows a broad level track, across a sea of lava. I suspect it is used for 4x4 tours, although I saw no such vehicles when I did the walk. The hard work comes if you decide to complete the walk to the summit, which involves a steep walk of about 1/3 of a mile up a slithery path. Actually this is more of a problem on the descent, when your feet slide a little  but there are no steep drops to worry about and it is worth the trip.

The walk is very interesting for several reasons. On the outward journey, there is a tremendous view west to the Montañas del Fuego de Tymanfaya and there is one volcano in particular where you can clearly see where the side of the crater collapsed, allowing a sea of lava to gush forth. The flow of the lava is clearly visible, across the land.

Montaña Los Rodeos itself is a mountain of orange rock covered with a grey/black ash. In places, the ash has been eroded allowing the colour beneath to show through and nowhere is this more apparent than on the steep ascent path to the top. The views from the summit are fantastic, stretching as far as the cliffs at Famara in the north. There are various volcanic cones around, not least Montaña Cuervo to the south and Caldera Blanca to the north-west.

Finally, on the return leg, you can clearly see where the sea of lava to the east flowed and the very edge of the “tide” comes alongside the track.

The walk starts from a large parking area planted with palm trees by the LZ-56. There is a brown sign with white lettering at the car park entrance for “Parque Natural de Los Volcanes”.

Start: Walk south-west along the obvious broad track leading from the car park, soon passing a part built (or part demolished – I could not decide which) building against the hillside on the right.

After quite some distance, you arrive at the base of Montaña Los Rodeos at effectively a ‘T’ junction. You can go either way round but I chose to turn right to walk anti-clockwise around the base of the mountain.

Eventually, you will pass some very large lumps of lava on the right closely followed by a small car parking area. The track divides. Take the left hand fork. Here, in the distance, to the right you can clearly see the volcanic cone which has collapsed at one side and the flow of lava from it.

You arrive at a large turning area defined by placed boulders. There are good views ahead of Montaña Cuervo. The route to the top of Montaña Los Rodeos is obvious, as an orange/red track ascending an otherwise grey/black mountain. You can either take this track (it really is worth it), or just continue on the easy track round the base of the mountain.

The summit path begins fairly gently then becomes steeper after a “false summit”.

The summit is marked by some rather pathetic cairns but the views are amazing.

Return to the main track by the turning area and turn left.

It is along this section that you can clearly see where the sea of lava flowed and the edge of the “tide” is alongside the track once you have descended a little.

The track curves back to the ‘T’ junction where the circuit started. Turn right to retrace your steps to the car park.

If you need to buy any hiking equipment/clothing before your trip see the Hiking Store

All information on this site is given in good faith and no liability is accepted in respect of any damage, loss or injury which might result from acting on it.