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John Kelly
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Kindle Books

Kindle book - My Lanzarote. 10 walks and a personal view

Kindle Book And A Pub For Lunch

5 Walks In The Yorkshire Dales

 

County Durham Walks in Teesdale

County Durham is the only county in England to actually have "County" in its name, which, it is believed, owes its origin to old postal area descriptions and was to distinguish it fro the city of Durham.

Overall, the County owes its historical prosperity to lead and coal mining, remnants of which can still be seen, farming and the heavy railway industry.

The "Durham Dales" include Weardale and Teesdale. Indeed at one time, the River Tees marked the border with Yorkshire, so some of my walks would then have been listed under the Yorkshire Dales!

To date, all my walks in Co. Durham explore Teesdale, which is beautiful and fully deserves to be included as part of the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

One thing you might notice in Teesdale is that, perhaps unusually, many of the farm buildings, even if constructed of stone, are painted white. This is because they all belong to the Raby Estate owned by Lord Barnard. Traditionally the white painted buildings indicated places where he might get hospitality.

Co. Durham Walks With "Traffic Light" Rating

For an explanation of the "traffic light "rating see My Walks page.

Each symbol = 2 miles

The start point for all walks can be located on Google Maps. Click here.

Barnard Castle to Cotherstone
Cauldron Snout and Cronkley Scar
Egglestone Abbey to Whorlton
Gaunless Valley and Woodland
High Force   
Maps used on these walks:

If you need to buy any hiking equipment/clothing before your trip see the Hiking Store

All information on this site is given in good faith and no liability is accepted in respect of any damage, loss or injury which might result from acting on it.